Tag Archives: NOAA

Massive Gulf of Mexico dead zone threatens economy and water quality

The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predicts the Gulf of Mexico’s annual summer dead zone – a low-oxygen area which can cause mass death of marine life – will grow over 40% this year compared to last summer, approaching the size of Massachusetts. The effects of this year’s dead zone on the local […]

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‘How high is your river?’ asks CrowdHydrology citizen science project

In 2010, a smartphone-based campaign that called on motorists to report roadkill sightings in California via text message inspired University of Buffalo (UB; N.Y.) hydrogeologist Chris Lowry to undertake an experiment. If it didn’t require any prior knowledge or specialized equipment besides the small computers we carry in our pockets, could ordinary people help gather […]

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Storms as destructive as Hurricane Harvey projected to happen more frequently

When Hurricane Harvey inundated eastern Texas late last August, the eye of the storm loitered over land for nearly a week rather than dispersing as it moved farther from the ocean, as most hurricanes do. The result was a stronger, more destructive storm, which dropped a record-breaking 127 cm (50 in.) of rain and directly […]

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Town of Rocky Ripple, Butler University, Indianapolis move forward on White River flood barrier

Occupying less than 81 ha (200 ac) between the White River and a canal on the northwestern edge of Indianapolis, flood protection is a serious matter for the small town of Rocky Ripple (Ind.). Lacking any infrastructure of its own to contain overflow from the river, the town’s less-than-700 residents routinely pay thousands of dollars […]

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Most U.S. coastlines will sink faster than the global average, NOAA report cautions

While sea levels across the world have long been expected to rise steadily as temperatures increase and ice caps melt, an alarming report from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) warns that almost all U.S. coastlines risk more dramatic changes in sea level than the global average. The Jan. 19 report frames potential changes […]

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NOAA launches improved national streamflow forecast model

In direct response to a call by the Obama administration for innovations in the conservation of domestic waterways earlier this year, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and its partners on Aug. 16 unveiled a comprehensive forecasting model to predict the movement of rivers and streams across the continental U.S. The National Water Model […]

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Michigan elementary schoolers reduce pollution while making art

More than 150 elementary school students and 30 educators from Bay County, Mich., have found a way to beautify their community while saving money on water bills. Five area schools and extracurricular groups recently met to paint rain barrels for display and use outside popular buildings throughout their community. Embracing this concept of green infrastructure, […]

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U.S. EPA report advises how stormwater techniques can aid climate change challenges

On May 19, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the release of the report, Stormwater Management in Response to Climate Change Impacts: Lessons from the Chesapeake Bay and Great Lakes Regions (EPA/600/R-15/087F). The report provides insights gleaned from workshops and assessments EPA and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) held with local planners on […]

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NOAA Releases Living Shorelines Guidance

On Oct. 28, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) released Guidance for Considering the Use of Living Shorelines. The agency encourages the use of living shorelines to protect sheltered coasts — those not exposed to open ocean wave energy — from intense storms, erosion, and sea level rise. Living shorelines include a range of shoreline […]

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New Website To Protect Coastlines Available

A new partnership between the College of William & Mary’s Virginia Institute of Marine Science, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and representatives from state agencies, nongovernmental organizations, academia, and private industry has formed to explore new ways to protect U.S. coastlines. At issue […]

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