Tag Archives: Flood protection

Study: New Trees Bring Stormwater Benefits Even Before Full Maturity

Planting native trees en masse can help prevent flooding by enhancing soil’s ability to absorb rainwater and provide a multitude of additional benefits, such as new wildlife habitats, greater carbon sequestration, and higher property values. For these reasons and more, seeding new forests and woodlands is a staple of green infrastructure approaches around the world. […]

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U.S. DHS Develops Low-Cost, High-Accuracy Flood Sensor Networks

Predicting major flood events before they occur can mitigate loss of life and better protect critical infrastructure, and so the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) considers flood-risk mitigation a crucial aspect of public safety. According to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), flooding ranks highly among the nation’s most costly natural disasters. […]

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Air, Land, and Sea: Airports Embrace Stormwater Management to Protect Water Quality

Often containing miles of impervious runways, ubiquitous chemical demands for sanitation and safety purposes, and enormous fleets of vehicles with the potential to drip fuels, airports face unique stormwater management challenges.

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Unique Seawall Design Provides Rain-or-Shine Benefits

Building seawalls around high-traffic coastal areas such as piers, boardwalks, and beachfronts often can provide suitable protection from storm surges, but this added security can entail a social cost. In many cases, seawalls obstruct ocean views. Even worse, while seawalls may confine floodwaters to the beach, they also can restrict convenient ocean access by pedestrians […]

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WEF Stormwater Committee webcast convenes East Coast climate change experts

Eastern U.S. coastal communities are particularly sensitive to ice-melt in the Arctic Sea, according to hydrologist David Vallee. Vallee, the Hydrologist-in-Charge at the National Weather Service’s Northeast River Forecast Center (Norton, Massachusetts), was one of three stormwater experts to discuss the effects of climate change on coastal and riverine areas of the eastern U.S. during […]

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New York City wetland project balances economy, ecology

In today’s urban development landscape, striking a balance between economic prosperity and environmental stewardship is increasingly difficult. If property developers fill wetlands and other natural landforms that accept stormwater runoff, provide habitat for wildlife, and control erosion, the result is often increased flooding and decreased biodiversity. On the other hand, development can stagnate if local […]

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Louisiana to receive $1.2 billion federal grant for flood projects

When Hurricane Katrina tore across Louisiana in 2005, decimating wide swaths of New Orleans, the region’s vulnerability to flooding from severe storms became a cautionary tale for municipalities around the world. In the years since, local, state, and federal governments have spent more than $20 billion surrounding the city with updated flood control measures, explored […]

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Researchers find floods one image at a time with new monitoring network

Flooding costs billions of dollars in damage annually in the U.S. alone, but finding reliable ways to determine when flooding occurs, predicting the intensity of that flooding, and communicating warnings to the public remains a challenge. Researchers at Northern Arizona University (NAU; Flagstaff) have launched an ambitious project aimed at making floods easier to track. […]

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Greek government to receive €70 million for flood-control projects

In July, flooding caused by an intense rainstorm in the Halkidiki region of northern Greece led to 7 deaths and more than 100 injuries. The flooding, which occurred in the middle of one of Greece’s traditionally driest months, knocked out water and power in much of the affected area for several weeks. The flood effects […]

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‘How high is your river?’ asks CrowdHydrology citizen science project

In 2010, a smartphone-based campaign that called on motorists to report roadkill sightings in California via text message inspired University of Buffalo (UB; N.Y.) hydrogeologist Chris Lowry to undertake an experiment. If it didn’t require any prior knowledge or specialized equipment besides the small computers we carry in our pockets, could ordinary people help gather […]

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