Tag Archives: Sediment

Still Impaired, Chesapeake Bay Shows Signs of Improvement

On Nov. 27, the Chesapeake Bay Program (CBP) released the “Bay Barometer,” a report detailing long- and short-term health trends of the bay and progress made throughout the watershed. Although the CBP says restoration work provides cause for optimism, ecological indicators continue to show impairment due to excess nutrients, chemical contaminants, and resource demands, the [...]

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NRCS Offers $35 Million in Assistance for National Water Quality Initiative

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is releasing nearly $35 million in financial assistance to farmers and ranchers as part of its second year of funding for the National Water Quality Initiative. The funds will be available in 164 priority watersheds, targeting conservation practices that reduce the delivery of nutrients, sediments, [...]

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Sediment Fluxes During Large Storms

In 2011, Tropical Storm Lee dropped 102 to 178 mm (4 to 7 in.) of rain on the Susquehanna River Basin in 4 days, creating a plume of 17 million megagrams (19 million tons) of sediment that extended 161 km (100 mi) into Chesapeake Bay. Based on initial forecasts, Superstorm Sandy, which hit the U.S. [...]

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Why is Bioretention So Popular?

In suburban areas, bioretention is becoming a common best management practice (BMP) for stormwater because it is cost-effective, as well as highly effective at reducing volume and removing pollutants. Other BMPs can be combined to effectively remove pollutants, but bioretention cells (BRCs) can be designed to incorporate a variety of pollutant removal mechanisms — from [...]

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