Tag Archives: Research

Climate Change Already Is Affecting Coastal and Island Communities

According to a recent analysis by Reuters, coastal flooding along the eastern U.S. has increased dramatically over the past four decades with triple the number of days per year that tidal waters reached or exceeded National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration flood thresholds. Water now reaches flood levels on average 20 days per year in many […]

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Level of Toxics in European Freshwater Greater than Anticipated

European Union member states have called for substantial improvements in freshwater quality by 2015 through the Water Framework Directive. While the European Environment Agency recently released a report on the excellent water quality of swimming beaches, a large-scale study by the Institute for Environmental Sciences Landau together with the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, both […]

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Iron Could Limit Spread of Dead Zones, Study Says

In late May, a study led by researchers at Oregon State University (OSU) and published in the journal Nature Geosciences suggests that iron released from continental margin sediments could limit the spread and duration of hypoxic areas, also known as dead zones. The iron may act as a natural limiting switch, keeping ocean systems from […]

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Report Covers Dissolved Metals Removal from Roadway Stormwater

In mid-May, the National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) released the report “Measuring and Removing Dissolved Metals from Stormwater in Highly Urbanized Areas.” The issue of dissolved metals is coming to the forefront in stormwater management and is an increasing concern for regulatory agencies. This is especially true in urbanized areas with limited space for […]

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NOAA and USGS Release New Datasets

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP) updates its national land cover and land change information every five years. NOAA recently released data on coastal intertidal areas, wetlands, and adjacent uplands gathered from 2010 to 2011 in U.S. coastal regions. The new data currently is available for California, Oregon, and […]

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PAH Decrease Due to Austin Coal-Tar Sealant Ban

The 2006 prohibition on the use of coal-tar-based pavement sealants in Austin, Texas, has resulted in a substantial reduction in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) levels, according to a new study published in the scientific journal Environmental Science and Technology by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). PAHs are an environmental health concern because several are probable […]

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Researchers Study Duckweed’s Potential for Removing Nitrogen

The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences and North Carolina State University are looking at the fast-growing aquatic plant duckweed as a bioremediation agent. Often considered a nuisance plant, some species can double every 36 hours. However, it is the plants’ fast-growing nature that makes them so effective at taking up certain pollutants, particularly nitrogen, […]

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VIMS Modeling Approach Predicts Street-Level Storm Tide

A team of researchers at the College of William & Mary’s Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS), accurately hindcasted Hurricane Sandy’s landfall along the U.S. Atlantic coast using a large-scale, unstructured grid storm tide model, called Semi-implicit Eulerian Lagrangian Finite Element. The researchers used data collected before Hurricane Sandy and tested the results with observations […]

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William Penn Foundation Invests $35 Million in Delaware River Watershed Initiative

The Delaware River watershed covers more than 34,965 km2 (13,500-mi2) in New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware. On April 1, the William Penn Foundation awarded $35 million in grants, launching a multi-year initiative to protect and restore critical sources of drinking water for 15 million people, many in major cities. More than 40 national […]

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Pine Beetles Alter Hydrology of Mountain Watersheds

The mountain pine beetle has caused the death of millions of acres of trees in western states ranging from New Mexico to British Columbia. In Colorado alone, the beetle is responsible for 1.4 million ha (3.4 million ac) of dead pine trees, as reported by the National Science Foundation. The tree deaths not only increase […]

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