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New NGICP director aims to guide job-training program to national recognition

The National Green Infrastructure Certification Program (NGICP), the first standardized job-training program in the U.S. for professionals working in green infrastructure construction, maintenance, and monitoring, is now open nationwide to partners, trainers, sponsors, and hopeful certificants. NGICP, founded in 2016 by the Water Environment Federation (WEF; Alexandria, Va.) and DC Water (Washington, D.C.), promotes a […]

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U.S. EPA to change rule-making process for wastewater blending

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced in April that it will work with states, municipalities, and subject-matter experts to set public health and safety standards for wastewater blending. The Water Environment Federation (WEF; Alexandria, Va.) will provide EPA with guidance and comments during the rule-making process. Wastewater blending is a procedure that water resource […]

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China embarks on massive stormwater projects to plan for future water risks

China is midway through its decades-long South—North Water Transfer Project, a massive system of aqueducts intended to convey 44.8 billion m3 (11.8 trillion gal) of fresh water each year from China’s rural, rainy south to its drier and more urbanized north. However, the country also is exploring far-reaching ways to use stormwater as the basis […]

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PWD has designed a monitoring program to collect many types of environmental data including precipitation, sewer flow, and data on GSI performance.

Data analyses confirm GSI value in overflow control

Designed to reduce combined sewer overflow, green infrastructure in the city of Philadelphia, Pa., in the U.S., has been proven effective based on monitoring data analyses, according to Dwayne Myers and Andrew Baldridge of CDM Smith and Chris Bergerson, Taylor Heffernan, Varsha Raj, Stephen White, and Elizabeth Mannarino of the Philadelphia Water Department. Many water […]

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Figure 1 from the 2018 publication (originally Figure 2.1 in the 2013 report) presents trends in different types of natural catastrophes worldwide from 1980 to 2016. The updated data shows a continuation of the trends previously observed whereby climate-related extreme events are rising, with a particularly sharp increase in hydrological events. (Data from MunichRE Natcatservice/EASAC)

New data updates earlier findings on extreme weather events

The European Academies’ Science Advisory Council (EASAC; Halle, Germany) recently released a publication that updates a previous 2013 EASAC report with new data showing that extreme weather events have become more frequent during the past 36 years. The new findings — which confirm the conclusions in the original report and extend the previous analysis — […]

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Porous pavement strengthened with waste carbon fiber composite material maintained infiltration rates above acceptable levels. (Photo courtesy of Washington State University)

Researchers use waste carbon fiber to strengthen permeable pavement

Researchers in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Washington State University have demonstrated that permeable pavement can be improved with the addition of recycled carbon fiber composite material. Associate research professor Karl Englund and Assistant professor Somayeh Nassiri supplemented permeable concrete mixes with composite scraps sourced from Boeing (Chicago) manufacturing facilities and found […]

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The sustainable design of King County's Georgetown Wet Weather Treatment Station includes a green roof, rain gardens, and cisterns to filter and collect stormwater. (Photo courtesy of King County)

WIFIA-financed King County, Wash., stormwater treatment project to protect water quality in the Duwamish River

Construction is underway in the Georgetown neighborhood of Seattle, Wash., on a combined sewer overflow (CSO) wet weather treatment station that will treat up to 265 million L/d (70 mgd) of polluted stormwater runoff that currently can flow into the Duwamish River during severe rain events. The $262 million Georgetown Wet Weather Treatment Station — […]

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Roadway runoff causes long-term sensory damage in Pacific Northwest salmon

Toxic roadway pollutants captured and conveyed by stormwater pose a serious threat to coho salmon and other fish in the Pacific Northwest’s urban watersheds. New research from Washington State University (WSU; Vancouver) shows that green infrastructure can help reduce mortality rates, but that pollutants can still potentially make fish more susceptible to predators.   Salmon’s […]

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Historic D.C. cemetery partners with environmentalists to reduce impervious space

To help lower monthly stormwater fees and the capacity for runoff generation at the Mount Olivet Cemetery in Washington, D.C., the Catholic Archdiocese of Washington (D.C.) has partnered with the D.C./Maryland chapter of The Nature Conservancy (TNC; Bethesda, Md.) to build more than $1.5 million of green stormwater infrastructure on the property. In 2013, DC […]

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State-of-the-art Hong Kong flooding project recognized for innovation and creativity

Located between a busy highway and Hong Kong’s Victoria Harbour, Happy Valley Recreation Ground is a heavily frequented hotspot for locals and tourists alike. But during the rainy season, the appeal of the low-lying neighborhood’s museums, sports fields, and horse-racing track is compromised by its high susceptibility to stormwater flooding. In 2008, for example, the […]

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