Archive | Wet Weather RSS feed for this section
Habitual flooding affects many parts of low-lying South Carolina during heavy rainstorms. With mounting pressure for municipalities to address their stormwater readiness, diverse South Carolinian communities are implementing equally diverse tactics and fundraising schemes to limit runoff pollution. (U.S. Department of Agriculture)

South Carolina municipalities find success with site-specific stormwater management plans

In South Carolina, which barely escaped the brunt of Hurricane Irma last summer, municipal stormwater managers are demonstrating that there is no “one-size-fits-all” solution to limit runoff pollution. And as the risks of poorly conceived stormwater management plans heighten with more frequent and more intense precipitation, the state’s big cities and beach towns are taking […]

Continue Reading

City of San Jose doubles down on stormwater control with ‘green streets’

The City of San Jose (Calif.) is demonstrating that when more than one green infrastructure measure comes together, impervious areas responsible for chronic stormwater management problems can become key parts of the solution. On Nov. 4, the City of San Jose Environmental Services Department (ESD) unveiled stormwater-focused retrofits to Park Avenue, a main thoroughfare in […]

Continue Reading

Gulf of Mexico researchers examine effects of Hurricane Harvey floodwaters

What happens when a hurricane sends fresh rainwater — up to 124.9 trillion L (33 trillion gal) of it — into the saltwater ocean? In the case of normal-sized storms, the rainwater, which is less dense than saltwater, typically sits atop the ocean in a distinct “blob,” which generally mixes into the ocean within hours […]

Continue Reading

‘Rainstorm generator’ predicts more frequent – but less intense – dryland thunderstorms

In the lowest and most arid parts of the Colorado River basin, moisture from the ground rises into the atmosphere before condensing rapidly to form frequent and sudden thunderstorms. These storms, which typically control the flow of runoff, provide irrigation for river-bank plants, supplement water supplies, and affect the chance that the river will flood, […]

Continue Reading

Revised consent decree extends timeline for crucial Baltimore City wet weather improvements

Since 2002, the City of Baltimore has worked alongside state and federal regulators to reduce the occurrence of sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs). An original consent decree compelled Baltimore to substantially improve its handling of SSOs by 2016, but technical and financial difficulties necessitated a longer timeline to achieve meaningful results. Pending court approval, a proposed […]

Continue Reading

Staten Island completes latest leg of award-winning stormwater project ahead of schedule

As the southernmost borough of New York City continues to expand and improve its natural wetlands, it also continues to earn recognition for its efforts to adapt to nature to solve chronic flooding issues. A sweeping Staten Island stormwater project, underway since 2014, in August received the Envision Silver Award from the Institute for Sustainable […]

Continue Reading

AquaCharge reuse planning tool offers unconventional routes to water security

Conventionally, only two strategies exist for urban water utilities to increase water supplies on a municipal scale: stormwater reuse and wastewater reuse. As separate processes that require separate infrastructure, piping costs, and specific land-use requirements, most utilities invest in one process over the other. However, as drier parts of the world teeter on the brink […]

Continue Reading

U.S. EPA opens 6th annual Campus RainWorks Challenge

University students in the U.S. interested in bringing natural stormwater runoff management to their campuses are invited to participate in the 6th-annual U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Campus RainWorks Challenge. Contest registration will be open from Sept. 1 to Sept. 30; full application materials must be submitted by Dec. 15.   How RainWorks works As […]

Continue Reading

Ambitious DC Water project to cut flood risks by up to 40%

Last October, DC Water (Washington, D.C.) wrapped up construction on the First Street Tunnel, an 822-m-long (2700-ft-long), 7-m-wide (23-ft-wide) stormwater pipe located approximately 10 stories beneath Bloomingdale, one of the District’s most historically flood-prone neighborhoods. In July, the First Street Tunnel passed its biggest real-world test to date. When a line of severe storms hit […]

Continue Reading

Melting snow thought to increase likelihood of seasonal earthquakes in California

Each summer, winter accumulations of snow in California’s various mountain ranges begin to melt. As they do, millions of liters of stormwater flow groundward, refilling aquifers and reservoirs while quenching farmland. When this much water falls from the mountains in an abbreviated period, it can spell disaster for those living below, as was almost the […]

Continue Reading