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China embarks on massive stormwater projects to plan for future water risks

China is midway through its decades-long South—North Water Transfer Project, a massive system of aqueducts intended to convey 44.8 billion m3 (11.8 trillion gal) of fresh water each year from China’s rural, rainy south to its drier and more urbanized north. However, the country also is exploring far-reaching ways to use stormwater as the basis […]

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Study: To combat toxic algal blooms, focus on phosphorus

The results of an experiment spanning nearly a half-century at the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD; Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada) claim that if water stewards want to stem the growth of harmful algal blooms, they should focus on phosphorus rather than nitrogen. The discovery, made by the same research organization credited with identifying phosphorus as […]

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Boston releases 50-year floodproofing plan to meet climate risks

Boston was built on climate resiliency planning. Early residents gradually filled in low-lying Atlantic Ocean tidelands as the city expanded. They turned small islands and peninsulas into neighborhoods high enough above sea level to prevent flooding from typical tides and storms. Today, some of these areas, such as East Boston and Charlestown, are among the […]

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Habitual flooding affects many parts of low-lying South Carolina during heavy rainstorms. With mounting pressure for municipalities to address their stormwater readiness, diverse South Carolinian communities are implementing equally diverse tactics and fundraising schemes to limit runoff pollution. (U.S. Department of Agriculture)

South Carolina municipalities find success with site-specific stormwater management plans

In South Carolina, which barely escaped the brunt of Hurricane Irma last summer, municipal stormwater managers are demonstrating that there is no “one-size-fits-all” solution to limit runoff pollution. And as the risks of poorly conceived stormwater management plans heighten with more frequent and more intense precipitation, the state’s big cities and beach towns are taking […]

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U.S. Government Accountability Office releases new report on stormwater management

On Oct. 30, the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) publicly released a new report analyzing the use of green infrastructure by municipalities to meet the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s stormwater requirements. The report, EPA Pilot Project to Increase Use of Green Infrastructure Could Benefit from Documenting Collaborative Agreements, was prepared in September 2017, but not […]

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Bills to help stormwater management and infrastructure moving through Congress

Several significant bills that would benefit stormwater infrastructure investments and management are moving through the U.S. House of Representatives and U.S. Senate. More concern by Congress to avoid overburdening ratepayers about community challenges to meet water infrastructure investments has led to growing support for integrated planning. Stormwater investment in particular can be hampered by limited […]

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FY2018 president’s proposed budget seeks to eliminate EPA runoff pollution grants, memo says

According to a March 21 memorandum, federal funding for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will decrease by 31% if Congress approves the President’s Budget for 2018 fiscal year. The decrease would cut funding for several voluntary and region-specific EPA programs to refocus the agency toward its “core statutory responsibilities,” the memo states. David Bloom, […]

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WEF hosts first Stormwater Institute member policy forum

WEF’s Stormwater Institute (SWI) hosted its first member policy forum on Tuesday, March 21 at the beginning of the National Water Policy Fly-In. This event, exclusive to SWI members, featured policy briefings from congressional staff, federal agencies, and included an update on early thoughts related to the proposed executive “skinny budget”.  Approximately 30 participants comprised […]

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Stormwater credit trading could ease Chesapeake Bay pollution, study says

Chesapeake Bay, the third-largest estuary in the world, has a chronic nutrient pollution problem. In 2010, gradual runoff pollution from more than 13.6 million people living in the watershed grew to national concern, prompting the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to set strict total maximum daily load (TMDL) regulations limiting nutrient emissions. Meeting those regulatory […]

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A retrospective on stormwater in 2016

By Chris French The first few months of every year seem to encourage stepping back to reflect upon the opportunities and changes that the last year brought.

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