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Standing guard around trees to increase stormwater infiltration

Trees can pack a big punch when it comes to reducing stormwater. But Robert Elliott, former Columbia University (New York) graduate student and co-founder of Get Urban Leaf (New York), believes there is untapped potential for using trees to manage runoff in cities. He led a university study that provides urban planners with information that […]

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U.S. EPA announces winners of the sixth annual Campus RainWorks Challenge

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the winners of its sixth annual Campus RainWorks Challenge, a national collegiate competition that engages the next generation of environmental professionals to design innovative solutions for stormwater pollution. “Today’s students are tomorrow’s innovators,” said EPA Office of Water Assistant Administrator David Ross. “Through EPA’s Campus RainWorks Challenge, we […]

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New NGICP director aims to guide job-training program to national recognition

The National Green Infrastructure Certification Program (NGICP), the first standardized job-training program in the U.S. for professionals working in green infrastructure construction, maintenance, and monitoring, is now open nationwide to partners, trainers, sponsors, and hopeful certificants. NGICP, founded in 2016 by the Water Environment Federation (WEF; Alexandria, Va.) and DC Water (Washington, D.C.), promotes a […]

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China embarks on massive stormwater projects to plan for future water risks

China is midway through its decades-long South—North Water Transfer Project, a massive system of aqueducts intended to convey 44.8 billion m3 (11.8 trillion gal) of fresh water each year from China’s rural, rainy south to its drier and more urbanized north. However, the country also is exploring far-reaching ways to use stormwater as the basis […]

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Porous pavement strengthened with waste carbon fiber composite material maintained infiltration rates above acceptable levels. (Photo courtesy of Washington State University)

Researchers use waste carbon fiber to strengthen permeable pavement

Researchers in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Washington State University have demonstrated that permeable pavement can be improved with the addition of recycled carbon fiber composite material. Associate research professor Karl Englund and Assistant professor Somayeh Nassiri supplemented permeable concrete mixes with composite scraps sourced from Boeing (Chicago) manufacturing facilities and found […]

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The sustainable design of King County's Georgetown Wet Weather Treatment Station includes a green roof, rain gardens, and cisterns to filter and collect stormwater. (Photo courtesy of King County)

WIFIA-financed King County, Wash., stormwater treatment project to protect water quality in the Duwamish River

Construction is underway in the Georgetown neighborhood of Seattle, Wash., on a combined sewer overflow (CSO) wet weather treatment station that will treat up to 265 million L/d (70 mgd) of polluted stormwater runoff that currently can flow into the Duwamish River during severe rain events. The $262 million Georgetown Wet Weather Treatment Station — […]

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Roadway runoff causes long-term sensory damage in Pacific Northwest salmon

Toxic roadway pollutants captured and conveyed by stormwater pose a serious threat to coho salmon and other fish in the Pacific Northwest’s urban watersheds. New research from Washington State University (WSU; Vancouver) shows that green infrastructure can help reduce mortality rates, but that pollutants can still potentially make fish more susceptible to predators.   Salmon’s […]

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Historic D.C. cemetery partners with environmentalists to reduce impervious space

To help lower monthly stormwater fees and the capacity for runoff generation at the Mount Olivet Cemetery in Washington, D.C., the Catholic Archdiocese of Washington (D.C.) has partnered with the D.C./Maryland chapter of The Nature Conservancy (TNC; Bethesda, Md.) to build more than $1.5 million of green stormwater infrastructure on the property. In 2013, DC […]

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These three tanks are part of the 113,500-L (30,000-gal) capacity stormwater capture and reuse system at the Grand Hyatt Atlanta. In all, the system has eight tanks. Stormwater, air conditioner condensate, and ice machine meltwater are collected and reused in the hotel’s cooling towers.

Simple hotel stormwater capture and reuse system benefits local environment

While rainy days during a vacation or business trip aren’t ideal, the Grand Hyatt Atlanta hotel in the Buckhead area of Atlanta, uses a simple stormwater collection and reuse system to make the most of wet weather. The hotel captures rain water from flat portions of its roof and an outdoor zen garden. It also […]

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Habitual flooding affects many parts of low-lying South Carolina during heavy rainstorms. With mounting pressure for municipalities to address their stormwater readiness, diverse South Carolinian communities are implementing equally diverse tactics and fundraising schemes to limit runoff pollution. (U.S. Department of Agriculture)

South Carolina municipalities find success with site-specific stormwater management plans

In South Carolina, which barely escaped the brunt of Hurricane Irma last summer, municipal stormwater managers are demonstrating that there is no “one-size-fits-all” solution to limit runoff pollution. And as the risks of poorly conceived stormwater management plans heighten with more frequent and more intense precipitation, the state’s big cities and beach towns are taking […]

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