Archive | March, 2017

Apply for the 2017 National Municipal Stormwater and Green Infrastructure Awards today

The Water Environment Federation is accepting applications for the 2017 National Municipal Stormwater and Green Infrastructure Awards. The entry period has been extended until Friday, April 14.

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A retrospective on stormwater in 2016

By Chris French The first few months of every year seem to encourage stepping back to reflect upon the opportunities and changes that the last year brought.

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Key stormwater detention site construction to begin at former Houston golf course

The City of Houston, Texas, and the Harris County Flood Control District (HCFD; Houston) are teeing up to build 10 stormwater detention basins on the site of the now-defunct Inwood Forest Golf Course in northwest Houston. Once completed, officials expect the network of basins to detain more than 1.3 billion L (350 million gal) of […]

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Billions spent worldwide to improve “natural” green infrastructure

The term green infrastructure generally refers to manmade structures that mimic the absorptive water control properties of nature. But more and more engineers, academics, and regulators are recognizing that the term also includes the very forests, meadows, and wetlands that inspire bioswales, porous hardscapes, and rain gardens. Last September, Governor Jerry Brown of California introduced […]

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Trinity River floodplain set to become one of nation’s largest and greenest urban parks

Following a $50 million donation from the widow of late Texas philanthropist Harold Simmons last October, the Trinity Park Conservancy (Dallas) soon will break ground on the largest civic project in the history of Dallas — a “Nature District” along the Trinity River Corridor roughly eleven times larger than Manhattan’s Central Park. Harold Simmons Park […]

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Study quantifies the impact of coastal runoff in dollars and cents

A recent Duke University (Durham, N.C.) study makes the first, long-sought evidence linking Gulf of Mexico hypoxia to economic effects. The study, published January in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows hypoxic dead zones in the gulf drive up the price of large shrimp relative to smaller sizes. This effect causes economic […]

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