Archive | February, 2016

EPA Reports Stormwater Funding Needs

On Jan. 13, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released a survey showing that $271 billion is needed to maintain and improve the nation’s clean water infrastructure. This includes wastewater and stormwater infrastructure as well as collection systems. EPA reports that $48 billion is needed to correct combined sewer overflows, and another $19.2 billion is […]

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Oregon Proposes Water Quality Trading Rules

On Dec. 10, the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) announced rules for developing a voluntary water quality trading program to facilitate pollution reduction and protect the quality of state waterways. The rulemaking addresses essential elements of DEQ’s water quality trading program, with appropriate standards for accountability, enforceability, and provisions to ensure transparency. A lack […]

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California Water Board Adopts Stormwater Strategy

On Jan. 6, the California State Water Resources Control Board adopted a strategy that advances stormwater management statewide. The new strategy views stormwater as a resource for present and future water supply needs. Unmanaged stormwater runoff presents a threat to human life and property, and it is a significant source of water quality pollution. However, […]

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‘Big and Bold’ stormwater pumping project featured in WE&T

The Trinity Watershed Management (TWM) Department of the City of Dallas relies on the Dallas Floodway System to protect about 4047 ha (10,000 ac) of the city from flooding. The system includes levees, pumping stations, detention basins, and gates. When analysis suggested upgrading six pumping stations and adding two more, TWM found the opportunity to […]

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Channelized Los Angeles River

WEF Backed Runoff Provision Included in Highway Bill

On Dec. 4, President Obama signed the Fixing American Surface Transportation (FAST) Act into law. It is the first long-term transportation bill passed by Congress in 10 years. The FAST Act will increase funding for highway transportation infrastructure by about 11% over 5 years. The highway reauthorization bill also included a stormwater management provision that […]

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DC Launches Urban Tree Canopy Program

On Dec. 18, 2015, the District Department of Energy and Environment (DOEE) hosted the first-ever tree summit. At the summit, Washington D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser announced the launch of Canopy 3,000. The program is a short-term public-private partnership aimed at expanding the number of trees planted on private property and public spaces throughout the district. […]

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Online Platform Supports Natural Infrastructure for Business

On Dec. 6, 2015, at the Global Landscapes Forum in Paris, the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) launched an online platform, Natural Infrastructure for Business. The platform seeks to increase awareness of the business opportunities in investing in ecosystems – or natural infrastructure – and to increase action. The ultimate objective of the […]

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Wales Releases Voluntary SuDS Standards

The Welsh government has released recommended non-statutory standards for sustainable urban drainage systems (SuDS). The standards are the result of 2 years of development with stakeholder engagement and public consultation. SuDS are intended to reduce flooding and overflows by freeing up capacity in the sewer system. This decreases the need for more costly grey infrastructure […]

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LIFT and Opti Partner for CMAC Field Study

Stormwater practitioners are invited to participate in the evaluation of continuous monitoring and adaptive control (CMAC) at scale. The trial is a collaboration between OptiRTC Inc. and the Leaders Innovation Forum for Technology (LIFT) ― a partnership between the Water Environment Research Foundation and Water Environment Federation to bring new water technologies to the field. […]

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Moderate Storms Drive Salt Marsh Erosion

Salt marshes are in retreat in many locations around the world, diminishing their ability to protect against violent storms. The biggest cause of their erosion is waves driven by moderate storms, not occasional major events such as Superstorm Sandy, according to new research from Boston University and the U.S. Geological Survey. “Generally, the more a […]

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